Monthly Archives: May 2014

Episode #28 – May 28, 2014

hippo2This week’s episode begins with music from Saint Paul’s underage tropical indie rock band Hippo Campus, before showcasing cuts from synth-heavy La Crosse act Random Tongues, MPLS indie fuzz trio Fury Things, Decorah’s legendary Joe Price, twangy country-folk singer Bill Geezy & the New Deal, and La Crosse alt-rockers Red Sky Warning. Lastly, this episode also features a track I recorded at Sun Studios in Memphis with my now-disbanded female-fronted rock band Accident Waiting to Happen.

Hippo Campus is a quartet of 2013 high school grads that was recently profiled on The Current’s local music blog by Andrea Swensson. Their sound is impressive. Tight and polished, it reminds me of Vampire Weekend, however that’s a comparison they brush off in the piece. Instead, they offer up the names of some more obscure English acts:

“In reality, the band says the are most influenced by Bombay Bicycle Club, Last Dinosaurs, Little Comets, and the defunct Manchester group WU LYF, who also had an enduring philosophical impact on Hippo Campus.”

It is sometimes too easy to forget how essential all-ages venues and stages are in developing and perpetuating a healthy music scene. Or as Ms. Swensson, put it in her piece:

“Why do these gifted young artists have to turn 18 before they can break into the wider local music community? “

As someone who both attended and played club gigs as a teenager (with my band Accident Waiting to Happen, also featured in this episode), I can certainly sympathize. While I have regrettably not been to a show at La Crosse’s all-ages mecca, The Warehouse,  in far too long, the club had such an overwhelmingly positive impact on my underage years that I make a point to donate whenever they have a fund drive. The Warehouse is vehemently against predatory “pay to play” policies as well, which Hippo Campus mentions in the piece by Swensson:

“There’s so much talent in younger bands nowadays,” says Jake Luppen, who leads Hippo Campus along with co-frontman and guitarist Nathan Stocker. “We have a bunch of friends who are doing the high school thing like we were doing last year. They’re all really talented, but it seems like a lot of venues prey on the fact that they’re so young, and make them sell a bunch of tickets. It’s a really big problem. These booking agencies, they don’t compensate for performances. You play shows for free unless you sell a bunch of tickets.”

Making live music accessible for all ages audiences and performers makes the entire music community stronger. I think musician and K Records founder Calvin Johnson put it best, in a quote that seems to pop up everywhere:

“Rock ‘n roll is a teenage sport, meant to be played by teenagers of all ages – they could be 15, 25 or 35. It all boils down to whether they’ve got the love in their hearts, that beautiful teenage spirit.”

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Episode #27 – May 21, 2014

ember2This week’s show features a pair of cuts from disarmingly intense nomadic songstress Ember Schrag, as well as music from Decorah’s Norwegian-American folk dance royalty The Foot-Notes, Britpop-influenced Wisconsin rockers Neon, McGregor Iowa’s Native American-inspired folk collective Big Blue Sky, and disbanded MPLS alt-rock vets X Ray Hip.

I had the pleasure to make Ember Schrag’s acquaintance and get familiar with her music during my stint as GM of KPVL in Decorah, when she was briefly living there in-between a move from her native Nebraska to her current location in New York. I was struck most by both her sparse, yet refined sound and her absolutely angelic, breathy, and lilting singing voice.

The avant-garde sounds, moody textures, and unique arrangements found on The Sewing Room give her otherwise sparse and simple folk / pop sound an enormous amount of depth and weight. It’s clear that Schrag spared no expense on The Sewing Room‘s production and was in fact assisted in bringing its engaging, yet prudent sound to life by a plethora of veteran East Coast musicians. As I’ve stated in other reviews, this polish pays off big.

Schrag’s singing voice, augmented by thematic and literate lyrics, is what really grabs one’s attention though. Plaintive and sweet while also feeling complicated, Schrag’s soft and judiciously accentuated vocals evoke a range of feelings; from earnestness to thrill-seeking, pensiveness to wonder. With The Sewing Room, Schrag has established an intriguing and compelling sound she can continue to explore for years to come.

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Episode #26 – May 14, 2014

fayme2This week’s show features music from La Crosse folk ‘n’ roots act Fayme Rochelle & The Waxwings, Madison funk group The Mustache, MPLS & Winona vaudeville throw-backs Jack Norton & Mullet River Boys, singer-songwriter Jonathan Delehanty, touring east coast chamber pop ensemble Cuddle Magic, MPLS & La Crosse indie space rock trio Chicane Theory, and stunning MPLS post-rock duo Bloodnstuff.

While the band Fayme Rochelle & The Waxwings have been together in some form or another for the past 5 years, Fayme Rochelle herself has been making music and writing songs for the past 10. Noting her background in English education, Second Supper Editor Adam Bissen wrote in late 2009 that Rochelle “has developed an innate ear for traditional melodies” and melds them with the “evocative lyrics of an English teacher.”

In that same article Rochelle went on to tell Bissen about her early musical influences and inspiration, stating “I just starting falling in love with Lucinda Williams and Gillian Welch. When I first starting listening to Gillian Welch, it was like ‘OK, that’s what I want to do.’ And Neko Case. I have like the biggest crushes on all of them.” Nearly five years, dozens of shows, and several albums later, I have no doubt that there are now up and coming Coulee Region singers and songwriters with musical crushes on Rochelle’s tasteful arrangements and amazing voice.

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Episode #25 – May 7, 2014

jakeThis week’s episode features a pair of alt-country tracks from the smokin’ new EP by Jake Ilika & The Heavy Set, in addition to music from twangy Eau Claire folk-punks The Heart Pills, guitarless lo-fi punk trio Kitten Forever, melodic garage rockers Rabbit Holes, dream pop shoegazers Puff Puff, and MPLS electronic pop duo DENNIS.

The new self-titled EP from Jake Ilika & The Heavy Set is a sophisticated and impressive debut. It boasts both high production value and well crafted songs, and for good reason.  The songs and their arrangements benefited from the luxury of developing organically at Jake’s weekly residency at the friendly Ed’s (no name) Bar in Winona. The band also sought out top-notch recording environments in Minneapolis, with producers Dylan Nau (Apolla Cobra, Nicholas David) and country singer-songwriter Erik Koskinen also contributing musically.

This polish pays off in a big way right from the get-go on the opener, Hate Coming Here. Jim Trouten’s lush melodies on the lap steel guitar, along with spacious back-up vocals and pensive lyrics, really help this song land a quick gut punch of emotional weight that both sound and feel similar to the heaviness, heartbreak, and desolation found in Beck’s 2002 album Sea Change or Mazzy Star’s 1993 hit Fade into You. Musically, this is alt-country at its finest.

Thief of a Lover, along with the other song featured in this episode, Minnesota Homegrown, were the two tracks recorded with Koskinen. Both songs showcase Ilika’s warm delivery and vocal dexterity in a big way. Imagine a cocktail party where the guest-list includes the sensitive world-weariness of Neil Young’s falsetto, the laid back softness of Jack Johnson’s baritone, the fullness and pride of Johnny Cash’s lower range, and a modest dose of John Mayer’s raspiness. Add in Koskinen’s country-fried plucking underneath Ilika’s versatile crooning on the chorus of Minnesota Homegrown, and it’s obvious that something special has been captured here.

At 6 minutes in length, the song I played in episode #6, Beggin’ for a Taste, still looms large for me and is arguably the EP’s most powerful accomplishment. Another Neil Young comparison is warranted here, this time for the relaxed intro and solos, in addition to the bittersweet minor-key cadences found in the verses. The song ends on an especially robust note with Trouten and bassist Jamie Groth joining Ilika for a build up of repeated group vocals that climaxes at 5 minutes and 30 seconds into the song with a soulful vibrato on Ilika’s lead vocal part.

It’s been a real pleasure to get to know, and really listen to, Jake Ilika and the Heavy Set’s music since their formation in January of 2013. Their debut EP is stellar snapshot of not only their talents and experience, but also some serious potential. I’m looking forward to enjoying a full length release sometime in the near future!

Stream or download this episode in a variety of formats
via archive.org by CLICKING HERE.

This episode can also be streamed or licensed via PRX.org by clicking here.

Click here to view this episode’s playlist